Call for Entries Now Open for NAHB's Sales and Marketing Awards–'The Nationals'

The Nationals–the National Association of Home Builders’ national sales and marketing awards program–is open for entries. Honoring the best in new-home sales, marketing and design, The Nationals competition acknowledges superior new-home sales and marketing achievements by individual sales and marketing professionals, home builders and associates, and local sales and marketing councils. The deadline for entering is Oct. 25, 2018.

The program recognizes builders and consultants for outstanding product design, interior merchandising, sales office design and landscaping. The competition continues to honor the most inspired new home marketing efforts, including logo design, graphics, brochures, signage, advertisements, overall advertising campaigns, special promotions and website design.

Silver Award winners (finalists) in each category will be announced online on Nov. 20. Gold Award winners will be announced during NAHB’s International Builders’ Show(r) at The Nationals gala on Tuesday, Feb. 19, 2019, at Caesars Palace Las Vegas.

The competition is presented by the National Sales and Marketing Council (NSMC), a council of the NAHB, along with Wells Fargo Home Mortgage. Preferred sponsors include major building product manufacturers, financial institutions, home builders and developers, architects and associates in real estate.

Join the best and the brightest in new home sales and marketing by entering The Nationals: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.thenationals.com_&d=DwIFAw&c=hCLxfJq9j_r9eaDl3ZiMkA&r=M8wVQlHg3ukfINJbMZzlXg&m=qLUHNz0XSYfEaZwQZ76kj8e9HVkvuT8kbQCwue3HC_8&s=qOPd-IDgjke3560SoRTrlpDyR_1Gzn1w-J0qtTS_GK4&e=.

Original Source

Housing Starts Fall 12.3 Percent As Tariffs Draw Increased Concern

Total housing starts fell 12.3 percent in June to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.17 million units, according to newly released data from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the Commerce Department.

The June reading of 1.17 million is the number of housing units builders would begin if they kept this pace for the next 12 months. Within this overall number, single-family starts fell 9.1 percent to 858,000 units. Meanwhile, the multifamily sector — which includes apartment buildings and condos — dropped 19.8 percent to 315,000.

Overall, permits — which are a sign of likely future housing production — dropped 2.2 percent to 1.27 million units in June, the lowest level of the year. Although single-family permits edged up 0.8 percent to 850,000, they remain at their second lowest reading of 2018. Multifamily permits fell 7.6 percent to 423,000.

“We have been warning the administration for months that the ongoing increases in lumber prices stemming from both the tariffs and profiteering this year are having a strong impact on builders’ ability to meet growing consumer demand,” said NAHB Chairman Randy Noel, a custom home builder from LaPlace, La. “This is why we continue to urge senior officials to take leadership and resolve this issue.”

While overall production is 7.8 percent higher than its level over the same period last year, the June report raises concerns about a softening in housing production over the near term.

“The concern over material costs, especially lumber, is making it more difficult to build homes at competitive price points, particularly for newcomers entering the housing market. Moreover, the soft permit report does not suggest a significant increase in housing production in the near term,” said NAHB Senior Economist Michael Neal. “However, consumer demand for single-family housing continues to increase as the overall economy and labor market strengthen.”

Combined single- and multifamily housing starts fell in all regions of the country. Starts fell 3 percent in the West, 9.1 percent in the South, 35.8 percent in the Midwest and 6.8 percent in the Northeast.

Looking at regional permit data, permits rose 6.2 percent in the South. Permits fell 1.8 percent in the West, 16.4 percent in the Northeast and 18.7 percent in the Midwest.

Original Source

Builder Confidence Stays at Healthy Level in July

Builder confidence in the market for newly-built single-family homes remained unchanged at a solid 68 reading in July on the National Association of Home Builders/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index (HMI).

“Consumer demand for single-family homes is holding strong this summer, buoyed by steady job growth, income gains and low unemployment in many parts of the country,” said NAHB Chairman Randy Noel, a custom home builder from LaPlace, La.

“Builders are encouraged by growing housing demand, but they continue to be burdened by rising construction material costs,” said NAHB Chief Economist Robert Dietz. “Builders need to manage these cost increases as they strive to provide competitively priced homes, especially as more first-time home buyers enter the housing market.”

Derived from a monthly survey that NAHB has been conducting for 30 years, the NAHB/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index gauges builder perceptions of current single-family home sales and sales expectations for the next six months as “good,” “fair” or “poor.” The survey also asks builders to rate traffic of prospective buyers as “high to very high,” “average” or “low to very low.” Scores for each component are then used to calculate a seasonally adjusted index where any number over 50 indicates that more builders view conditions as good than poor.

The HMI index measuring current sales conditions remained unchanged at 74. Meanwhile, the component gauging expectations in the next six months dropped two points to 73 and the metric charting buyer traffic rose two points to 52.

Looking at the three-month moving averages for regional HMI scores, the Northeast rose one point to 57 while the Midwest remained unchanged at 65. The West and South each fell one point to 75 and 70, respectively.

Editor’s Note: The NAHB/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index is strictly the product of NAHB Economics, and is not seen or influenced by any outside party prior to being released to the public. HMI tables can be found at nahb.org/hmi. More information on housing statistics is also available at housingeconomics.com.

Original Source

Statement from NAHB Chairman Randy Noel in Support of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court

Randy Noel, chairman of the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) and a custom home builder from LaPlace, La., issued the following statement of support for Judge Brett Kavanaugh to be the next Associate Justice to the U.S. Supreme Court:

“NAHB supports President Trump’s nomination of Judge Kavanaugh as Associate Justice to the U.S. Supreme Court. He is a worthy successor to retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy. Throughout his distinguished career, Judge Kavanaugh has been recognized for his sharp legal mind and as a stalwart defender of our Constitution.

“Judge Kavanaugh is eminently qualified to serve on our nation’s highest court. We would urge all senators to vote yes on his confirmation and oppose any efforts to delay consideration.”

Original Source

New Home Sales Rise to Highest Level This Year

Sales of newly built, single-family homes rose 6.7 percent in May to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 689,000 units after a downwardly revised April report, according to newly released data by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the U.S. Census Bureau. This is the second-highest sales report since the Great Recession.

“Sales numbers continue to grow, spurred on by rising home equity, job growth and reports of a greater number of millennials entering the single-family housing market,” said NAHB Chairman Randy Noel, a custom home builder from LaPlace, La.

A new home sale occurs when a sales contract is signed or a deposit is accepted. The home can be in any stage of construction: not yet started, under construction or completed. In addition to adjusting for seasonal effects, the May reading of 689,000 units is the number of homes that would sell if this pace continued for the next 12 months.

The inventory of new homes for sale was 299,000 in May, which is a 5.2-month supply at the current sales pace. The median sales price was $313,000.

“We saw a shift to more moderately priced home sales this month, which is an encouraging sign for newcomers to the market,” said NAHB Senior Economist Michael Neal. “Since the end of the Great Recession, inventory has tracked the pace of sales growth. While we expect continued gains in single-family housing production, inventory may be partially constrained by ongoing price increases for lumber and other construction materials.”

Regionally, new home sales rose 17.9 percent in the South to a post-recession high and remained unchanged in the Midwest. Sales dropped 8.7 percent in the West and 10 percent in the Northeast.

Original Source

Statement from NAHB Chairman Randy Noel on House Passage of Farm Bill

Randy Noel, chairman of the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) and a custom home builder from LaPlace, La., today issued the following statement on House passage of the farm bill:

“NAHB commends the House for passing the farm bill. The legislation includes provisions of importance to the housing community. It implements critical forest management reforms that will help improve the health of our forest system and reduce our reliance on foreign sources of timber. This is especially important given that soaring lumber prices—exacerbated by 20 percent tariffs on imports of Canadian softwood lumber—are harming housing affordability.

“The bill would also repeal the Obama administration’s waters of the U.S. (WOTUS) rule, allowing the EPA and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to craft a new rule that protects the environment without impeding economic growth.”

Original Source

Builders Discuss Rising Lumber Prices with Commerce Secretary Ross

Randy Noel, chairman of the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) and a custom home builder from LaPlace, La., issued the following statement after the NAHB leadership met today with Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to discuss the growing problem of escalating lumber prices that are being exacerbated by tariffs on Canadian lumber imports into the U.S.:

“Today, we discussed with Secretary Ross our mutual concern that lumber prices have risen sharply higher than the tariff rate would indicate, and that this is hurting housing affordability in markets across the nation. Rising lumber prices have increased the price of an average single-family home by nearly $9,000 and added more than $3,000 to the price of the average multifamily unit.

“We applaud Secretary Ross for acknowledging the gravity of this situation and expressing a willingness to look into the possibility that factors other than the tariff may be manipulating the market.

“We also encouraged the secretary to return to the negotiating table with Canada. It is essential that the two sides resume talks and hammer out a long-term solution to this trade dispute that will ensure U.S. home builders have access to a stable supply of lumber at reasonable prices to keep housing affordable for hard-working American families.”

Original Source

Housing Starts Reach Post-Recession High in May as Permits Soften

Total housing starts rose 5 percent in May to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.35 million units, according to newly released data from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the Commerce Department. This is the highest housing starts report since July 2007.

While housing production numbers rose, overall permits — which are a sign of future housing production activity — dropped 4.6 percent to 1.3 million units in May. Single-family permits fell 2.2 percent to 844,000 while multifamily permits fell 8.7 percent to 457,000.

“Ongoing job creation, positive demographics and tight existing home inventory should spur more single-family production in the months ahead,” said NAHB Chief Economist Robert Dietz. “However, the softening of single-family permits is consistent with our reports showing that builders are concerned over mounting construction costs, including the highly elevated prices of softwood lumber.”

The May reading of 1.35 million is the number of housing units builders would begin if they kept this pace for the next 12 months. Within this overall number, single-family starts rose 3.9 percent to 936,000 — the second highest reading since the Great Recession. Meanwhile, the multifamily sector — which includes apartment buildings and condos — rose 7.5 percent to 414,000 units.

Year-to-date, single-family and multifamily production are respectively 9.8 percent and 13.6 percent higher than their levels over the same period last year. The year-to-date metric can help compare performance data over a specific time period and show growth trends.

“We should see builders continue to increase production to meet growing consumer demand even as they grapple with stubborn supply-side constraints, particularly rising lumber costs,” said NAHB Chairman Randy Noel, a custom home builder from LaPlace, La.

Regionally, the Midwest led the nation with a 62.2 percent increase in combined single- and multifamily housing starts. Starts fell 0.9 percent in the South, 4.1 percent in the West and 15 percent in the Northeast.

Looking at regional permit data, permits rose 42.1 percent in the Northeast and 7.2 percent in the Midwest. They fell 4.6 percent in the West and 13.9 percent in the South.

Original Source

Statement from NAHB Chairman Randy Noel on Rules Pertaining to AHPs

Randy Noel, chairman of the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) and a custom builder from LaPlace, La., today issued the following statement regarding the Trump administration’s finalized rule promoting association health plans:

“NAHB commends President Trump and his administration for championing association health plans (AHPs) as a way to help small businesses to rein in skyrocketing health care costs and to provide better health coverage for workers.

“The new rule released today implements the executive order on AHPs signed by President Trump last fall. It will allow small businesses access to better and more affordable health care plans, place these firms on an equal footing with large employers and unions when it comes to negotiating lower costs for coverage and level the playing field for smaller companies that want to help their workers and their families with their health care needs.

“NAHB has been a long-time proponent of AHPs, which empower small businesses to pool together to purchase health insurance plans for their employees. Allowing sole proprietors and independent contractors to participate in the program will expand access to affordable health coverage, particularly among small employers and self-employed individuals.”

Original Source

Builder Confidence Slips Two Points as Lumber Prices Soar

Builder confidence in the market for newly-built single-family homes fell two points to 68 in June on the National Association of Home Builders/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index (HMI). The decline was due in large part to sharply elevated lumber prices, although sentiment remains on solid footing.

“Builders are optimistic about housing market conditions as consumer demand continues to grow,” said NAHB Chairman Randy Noel, a custom home builder from LaPlace, La. “However, builders are increasingly concerned that tariffs placed on Canadian lumber and other imported products are hurting housing affordability. Record-high lumber prices have added nearly $9,000 to the price of a new single-family home since January 2017.”

“Improved economic growth, continued job creation and solid housing demand should spur additional single-family construction in the months ahead,” said NAHB Chief Economist Robert Dietz. “However, builders do need access to lumber and other construction materials at reasonable costs in order to provide homes at competitive price points, particularly for the entry-level market where inventory is most needed.”

Derived from a monthly survey that NAHB has been conducting for 30 years, the NAHB/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index gauges builder perceptions of current single-family home sales and sales expectations for the next six months as “good,” “fair” or “poor.” The survey also asks builders to rate traffic of prospective buyers as “high to very high,” “average” or “low to very low.” Scores for each component are then used to calculate a seasonally adjusted index where any number over 50 indicates that more builders view conditions as good than poor.

All three HMI indexes inched down a single point in June. The index measuring current sales conditions fell to 75, the component gauging expectations in the next six months dropped to 76, and the metric charting buyer traffic edged down to 50.

Looking at the three-month moving averages for regional HMI scores, the Northeast rose two points to 57 while the West and Midwest remained unchanged at 76 and 65, respectively. The South fell one point to 71.

Editor’s Note: The NAHB/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index is strictly the product of NAHB Economics, and is not seen or influenced by any outside party prior to being released to the public. HMI tables can be found at nahb.org/hmi. More information on housing statistics is also available at housingeconomics.com.

Original Source